Osteopath Leeds

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Serving our community for nearly 30 years

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What Is Osteopathy

Osteopathy is a recognised way of improving the body’s own natural healing ability. An established way of treating problems with muscles, ligaments, nerves and joints, trained osteopaths recognise that much of the pain and disability we suffer stems from abnormalities in our body’s structure and functions.

Osteopaths have a detailed knowledge of anatomy and physiology and a highly developed sense of touch which they use to detect and release areas of tension or structural imbalance. Osteopaths do not focus on treating conditions but on ensuring that the musculoskeletal framework is physically comfortable and balanced.

They take a holistic approach and believe that your whole body will work well if it is in good structural balance. This effective and natural approach to healthcare can be used to ensure a healthy body for life.

 

Osteopath Leeds

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What Does Osteopathy Involve?

Osteopathy treatment involves gentle, manual techniques. Our highly experienced osteopaths can ease your pain and improve your mobility using these gentle techniques through our Osteopathy Leeds Based Centre. We can treat back pain among other ailments. Our osteopaths also specialise in cranial osteopathy.

How Can It Help Me?

Osteopathy is an effective treatment for lower back pain, as recommended by the Royal College of General Practitioners and guidelines from the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE).

Here at the Good Health Centre we also recognise the benefits of osteopathic treatment for a wide variety of muscular and joint pains, as well as problems caused by poor posture. Osteopathy can also relieve a number of other health complaints, including some that may surprise you:

  • Headaches arising from problems with the neck and migraine prevention
  • Generalised aches and pains including arthritic pain
  • Aches and pains during pregnancy
  • Work-related discomfort in the back, hands and arms
  • Joint pain including hip and knee pain from osteoarthritis
  • General, acute and chronic back ache and back pain
  • Mechanical neck pain
  • Problems with the shoulder and elbow including frozen shoulder and tennis elbow
  • Circulatory problems
  • Cramp
  • Digestion problems
  • Sciatica
  • Muscle spasms
  • Neuralgia
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Rheumatic pain.

Headaches are often caused by stiffness and tension in the neck which can be eased with osteopathic treatment. Many people experience aches and pains as part of the ageing process. Painkillers are not the only solution here. Osteopathy can address the underlying causes of pain and can also help to reduce discomfort and stiffness in the early stages of arthritis.

Changes to a woman’s body during pregnancy can put a strain on the whole of her spine. Osteopathic treatment can help the body adapt to the many changes it experiences over this very special nine months. For many people their day-to-day work, whether at a computer terminal or in heavy industry, can bring about disorders in the muscles, tendons and joints, particularly in the back, hands and arms.

Osteopaths treat many conditions related to the workplace including postural and repetitive strain issues, and can also give remedial advice and preventative exercises. Osteopathy can also be used to treat sporting injuries, and can improve performance in running and cycling plus a variety of other sports.

The Osteopathy Treatment

Our highly skilled osteopaths use their hands to diagnose and treat problems with the structure of the body and how it’s functioning.

Your treatment may include:

  • muscle and tissue stretching
  • rhythmic joint movements
  • high velocity thrusts, which are short, sharp movements.

These techniques help to reduce joint stiffness and muscle tension, and help the spine and joints to move more freely, improving body function and bringing about a greater feeling of wellbeing.

As we manipulate the body, there is sometimes a ‘cracking’ noise. While this may sound alarming to some people, it is nothing to worry about and is both expected and normal. It is simply the sound of gas bubbles popping in the joint fluid.

What To Expect

On your first visit to the Good Health Centre, your osteopath will ask questions about your full medical history and examine your body to make an in-depth assessment. We advise you to wear loose clothing that you feel comfortable moving in.

You may be asked to remove some outer clothing and to perform some simple movements. Your osteopath will use their hands to identify any weakness or points of strain. This will help them to diagnose your condition and develop a treatment plan tailored specifically to your needs.

We find that a course of three to six treatments offers the greatest benefit to our patients. However, some chronic conditions may need regular treatments to prevent a relapse. Please be aware that some patients may feel a little sore or stiff after their treatment.

This is normal and usually lasts no more than 24 to 48 hours.

FAQs

 

What will happen at my first appointment?
On your first visit to Good Health Centre, your osteopath will ask questions about your full medical history and examine your body to make an in-depth assessment. We advise you to wear loose clothing that you feel comfortable moving in. You may be asked to remove some outer clothing and to perform some simple movements. Your osteopath will use their hands to identify any weakness or points of strain. This will help them to diagnose your condition and develop a treatment plan tailored specifically to your needs.You are welcome to bring a friend or relative to be present throughout the consultation if it would help you to feel more comfortable.

Does osteopathy treatment hurt?
Some soft tissue treatment may cause discomfort during treatment. Your osteopath will tell you what to expect, and will want you to tell them if you experience any pain. You may feel stiff or sore after your osteopathy treatment – this is a normal, healthy response and will subside within 24 to 48 hours.

Do I need to see my doctor first?
You do not need to see your doctor first if you are paying for your own treatment. However, some insurance companies require you to see your doctor first. Osteopathy is available on the NHS in some areas – and national guidelines say it should be available everywhere for lower back pain.

How many treatments will I need?
The number of osteopathy treatments needed depends very much on the individual and their condition. We find that a course of three to six treatments offers the greatest benefit to our patients. However, some chronic conditions may need regular treatments to prevent a relapse. Your osteopath will be able to tell you within a short space of time whether they can treat you, or if they need to refer you to another medical professional.

How much does treatment cost?
We list all our osteopaths’ rates on this website. The majority of health schemes and insurance companies recognise osteopathy as a therapy and will reimburse the cost of treatments provided you confirm this with them first.

How soon can I see an osteopath?
We understand that people lead busy lives. Here at Good Health Centre we are aware of the need to be flexible with appointment times. With this in mind, we are open from 8am until 9pm on Tuesdays, 8am until 7pm on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, until 7.30pm on Thursdays and on Saturdays from 9am until 3pm. Furthermore, we always try and accommodate our patients as soon as possible.

Cautions & Care

Osteopathy is a very safe, non-invasive treatment without the side effects of drugs. However, it’s important to let your osteopath know if you have any medical conditions before your treatment begins as they can choose the appropriate techniques for your condition.

For example, the use of a technique known as a high velocity thrust is not advisable if you have osteoporosis, broken bones, ligament damage or joint inflammation. It should also be avoided in certain medical conditions including cancer, aneurysm, bleeding disorders, multiple sclerosis, and in the first trimester or pregnancy.

There has been some discussion about the potential risks of spinal manipulation. However, the British Medical Journal concluded that the risk was very low, with the chance of a stroke between 1 and 3 in patients who have experienced 1 million manipulations.

A separate medical review found that spinal manipulation was safer than the use of non-steroidal anti inflammatory drugs. If you have any concerns before your treatment starts, please raise them with your osteopath who will be happy to talk through them with you.

Useful Links

General Osteopathic Council
www.ostepathy.org.uk

The Princes Foundation for Integrated Health
www.fih.org.uk

Expert Osteopath Leeds:

If you’re looking for help with back pain, neck pain, sciatica, or any other pain or injury then you’ve found the right place.

You can book an appointment quickly and easily online by clicking below, if you have any questions prior to booking please get in touch with us on 0113 237 1173 or Email Us and one of the team will be in touch asap!

What our customers say about us…

We score 97% from 1100 + reviews.

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Need a same day appointment? Call us on 0113 237 1173.

Back Pain

If you have back pain, whether new or long-term, you know how it can interfere with your daily life.

Knee Pain

If you have knee pain, you’re not alone. Frequent knee pain affects around one in four adults.

Neck Pain

From a wry neck to arthritis, muscle spasm to a ‘dowager’s hump’, necks are a common source of pain.

Shoulder Pain

Under normal circumstances, the shoulder has the greatest mobility of any of the body’s joints. But when something goes wrong, it can mean pain, limitation and frustration.

Sciatica

Sciatica refers to pain that runs from the low back into the buttock and down the back of the thigh. It may go below the knee and into the foot.

Heel Pain

There are many causes of heel pain. These include plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendinosis, heel spurs, and stress fractures. 

What our patients say

Naakesha Michl
Naakesha Michl
2024-06-03
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Staff from reception to physio absolutely excellent. Couldn't recommend enough- I saw Aisha for a Mummy MOT and wholeheartedly recommend.
Marta Seiler
Marta Seiler
2024-06-03
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My awful pain reduced in one settion by Emma. More than grateful to be able to move
Rachel Fleming
Rachel Fleming
2024-06-03
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I had an appointment for my 16 week old baby and for myself with Simon Barron. My baby has been having some feeding issues and trapped wind. Instantly I felt heard, and in safe hands. Simon is so knowledgeable and explained why we might be having these problems & why the baby might be a bit tense in certain areas. It all made sense finally. Simon was gentle and so good with my baby (he really enjoyed it and was all smiles!) Simon taught us exercises and techniques to try at home with the baby and they are already helping him. I’m so grateful we found Simon and will be returning frequently. Don’t fret if you’re wondering about doing this for your baby, it’s 100% worth it!
Jacqueline Randall
Jacqueline Randall
2024-05-28
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Excellent experience with Aisha for a Mummy MOT would highly recommend!
MICHAEL JOHNSTON
MICHAEL JOHNSTON
2024-05-28
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Professional experience with Seb and helped with my back issues. Would recommend.
Reka Janovszki
Reka Janovszki
2024-05-24
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Simon and Josh are two of the best Osteopaths I’ve seen at Good Health for my sport injuries. They have helped me prepare for Hyrox, treated running and cycling injuries. I’d highly recommend them both!
Hussein Aoni
Hussein Aoni
2024-05-18
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Staff at Good health centre and Osteopath Adnan were Extremely efficient , they managed to expedite the appointment to see me. Friendly and professional . Thank you
stephen ongley
stephen ongley
2024-05-17
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Excellent levels of expertise!
Alex Matza
Alex Matza
2024-05-10
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Always professional and helpful, my sessions have been life saving. Thank you.
Helen Fitton
Helen Fitton
2024-05-08
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I have used the Good Health centre over many years. Seb, one of the osteopaths, helps me maintain a quality of life that I wouldn't otherwise enjoy. He is always patient and kind, and treats me with respect. The receptionists are always cheerful, and make one feel welcome. I would highly recommend.

Osteopathy FAQS & Further Reading

What is an Osteopath?

An osteopath is someone who assesses, diagnoses and treats people with conditions and injuries, primarily using their hands.

Legally, to use the title ‘osteopath’, they must hold a recognised qualification (usually a three- or four-year degree) and be registered with the General Osteopathic Council (GOsC), which ensures the high standards of the profession.

Osteopaths are primary care practitioners. That means patients don’t need a referral from a GP or other doctor to see an osteopath. Please note, though, that some private health insurance companies will require a medical referral before they cover the costs – do check with your provider if you are planning to use health insurance.

They are part of the group recognised by the NHS as Allied Health Professionals (AHPs), along with physiotherapists, radiographers and paramedics, among others.

Osteopathy is based on three main concepts. Firstly, all parts of the body are interrelated. Secondly, the way a body functions adapts to its structure, and vice versa. And thirdly, the body has an inherent capacity for healing.

These principles mean that osteopaths evaluate and treat holistically. They consider all the physical, social and psychological factors that might be contributing to a problem.

What is an Osteopath?

An osteopath is someone who assesses, diagnoses and treats people with conditions and injuries, primarily using their hands.

Legally, to use the title ‘osteopath’, they must hold a recognised qualification (usually a three- or four-year degree) and be registered with the General Osteopathic Council (GOsC), which ensures the high standards of the profession.

Osteopaths are primary care practitioners. That means patients don’t need a referral from a GP or other doctor to see an osteopath. Please note, though, that some private health insurance companies will require a medical referral before they cover the costs – do check with your provider if you are planning to use health insurance.

They are part of the group recognised by the NHS as Allied Health Professionals (AHPs), along with physiotherapists, radiographers and paramedics, among others.

Osteopathy is based on three main concepts. Firstly, all parts of the body are interrelated. Secondly, the way a body functions adapts to its structure, and vice versa. And thirdly, the body has an inherent capacity for healing.

These principles mean that osteopaths evaluate and treat holistically. They consider all the physical, social and psychological factors that might be contributing to a problem.

What does an Osteopath do?

Osteopaths help people with a wide variety of pain, injuries and conditions.

They are trained in diagnosis, and they use a range of manual therapy techniques to resolve problems.

The first step is for the osteopath to listen to the patient’s story. They will ask questions about the problem, such as how it started and what affects it. They will also ask about the patient’s general health and medical history.

Then, they examine the patient to ascertain the cause of their problem and the factors that might be contributing to it. 

This examination combines observing how a patient moves, assessing parts of the patient’s body using their hands, and sometimes using clinical tests such as blood pressure measurement or nerve testing. 

Having made a diagnosis, the osteopath formulates a management plan. The plan includes hands-on treatment, using techniques such as massage, stretching, joint mobilisation, manipulating (or ‘clicking’) joints, cranial techniques, and others. They discuss the treatment with the patient, making sure they understand and are happy with it. 

The osteopath may also suggest home exercises or lifestyle adaptations that would benefit the patient. 

What do Osteopaths treat?

Osteopaths treat people with many kinds of pain, injuries and conditions. People of all ages go to osteopaths to improve their health and function. 

Here are some examples of things osteopaths treat on a regular basis: 

  • Joint pain and arthritis
  • Muscle or ligament damage, strains and sprains
  • Tendon problems, such as tennis or golfer’s elbow and Achilles tendinopathy
  • Frozen shoulder
  • Neck and back pain (whether new or longstanding)
  • Certain common types of headaches, and migraine prevention
  • Nerve problems (pain, tingling or numbness)
  • Sciatica
  • Circulatory problems
  • Digestive problems
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Minor sports injuries
  • Postural changes, including those affecting pregnant women 

Once an osteopath understands the problem, they will explain what treatment they can provide and how long they expect it to take. For the most part, a course of treatment lasts from three to six sessions. 

Some patients with ongoing or chronic conditions choose to have regular treatment to give them maximum benefit. You can discuss this option with your osteopath if you think it might be right for you. 

Osteopaths also know what they can’t treat, and will refer you to another health professional, such as your GP, if necessary.

What is the difference between a Chiropractor and an Osteopath?

Both chiropractors and osteopaths diagnose and treat pain and injuries. Both use their hands to improve the health and function of the body. But there are some differences in how they work. 

Chiropractors:

  • tend to focus treatment on adjusting the spinal joints to improve nerve function
  • are qualified to take and interpret X-rays
  • generally use shorter treatment sessions, on average between 15 and 30 minutes

Osteopaths:

  • tend to work more widely, directing treatment at all areas of the body, including other joints, soft tissues and sometimes internal organs
  • will refer patients (either via their GP or privately) to a radiographer for X-rays, if necessary
  • generally use longer treatment sessions, on average between 30 and 60 minutes 

From the patient’s perspective, there’s a good deal of overlap in the way osteopaths and chiropractors treat. As a guideline, you’ll receive shorter treatments from a chiropractor that are more focused on spinal manipulation. Osteopathy sessions tend to be longer and more wide-ranging. 

Chiropractors and osteopaths are both skilled in diagnosing and treating the same kinds of problems. Some practitioners specialise in treating people with certain problems or conditions, so it can be worth doing a little research to find someone with knowledge that’s relevant to you. 

Many people choose their practitioner based on reviews or word-of-mouth recommendations. The key is to find an experienced practitioner with whom you feel comfortable. 

What is Osteopathic medicine?

Osteopathic medicine is a term mostly used in the United States. There, a D.O. (Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine) has the same training and qualifications as a medical doctor, as well as their osteopathic training. They use the principles of osteopathy in their medical practice, and they include manual therapy as part of their treatment. 

In other parts of the world, the osteopathic profession remains separate from medical training, so the term ‘osteopath’ is used, rather than ‘Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine’. 

There’s sometimes confusion between an American ‘D.O.’ (Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine) and a British ‘DO’ (an osteopath who has a Diploma in Osteopathy). A British DO is a fully qualified osteopath but does not hold a medical degree. 

Other osteopathic qualifications used in the UK include:

  • ‘BSc. (Hons) Osteopathy’ – Bachelor of Science in Osteopathy
  • ‘B(Ost)’ – Bachelor of Osteopathy
  • ‘M(Ost) – Master of Osteopathy

These titles simply reflect the evolution of osteopathic education – rest assured that all osteopaths in the UK have the appropriate level of training required to fulfil the rigorous standards of the General Osteopathic Council.

Can an Osteopath help with Sciatica?

Osteopaths are experts at treating sciatica. The key is to diagnose and treat its underlying cause. 

Sciatica develops for many reasons. There’s usually a problem in the lower back, such as a bulging disc or a narrowing of the spinal canal. These press on the sciatic nerve roots, triggering symptoms such as leg pain, tingling or numbness, or weakness in the leg or foot. 

Osteopaths can diagnose the cause of your sciatica using information you give them, tests they can do in the clinic, and, if necessary, imaging such as X-ray or MRI. 

Once they understand the underlying cause, osteopaths can help reduce or resolve the sciatica symptoms. They use massage and mobilisation to improve flexibility, ease tension and reduce the pressure on the nerve. 

They can also advise on what to avoid, changes you can make to reduce your symptoms, and exercises to help you recover more quickly.

Can an Osteopath help with back pain?

Yes! Back pain is the condition that osteopaths treat most frequently. 

Back pain comes in all shapes and sizes, from a mild, nagging ache to sharp, severe, debilitating pain that stops you moving. Sometimes it comes and goes, sometimes it’s new and unknown, or perhaps it has been around for years. 

The role of the osteopath is firstly to determine what’s causing the pain – for example, is it a rib strain, or perhaps there’s an inflamed disc? 

Secondly, the osteopath will try to understand why it’s happening. Was it triggered by a recent cough, for example? Or has a painful knee altered your walking gait and increased the pressure on one side of your back? 

Once they have all these elements in place, the osteopath can determine the best course of action. It might be massage to reduce the muscle tension around your spine, combined with manipulation to improve mobility, then treatment to the knee to stop it causing the problem. It might also include advice on exercise, posture, sleeping positions, stress management, or other things. 

An osteopath’s aim is not just to ease symptoms, but to treat the underlying causes for lasting relief. 

Is an Osteopath a doctor?

In most parts of the world, including the UK, osteopathy is a standalone profession. Most osteopaths are not qualified doctors, and they do not use the title ‘Doctor’.  

In the USA, most osteopaths are ‘Doctors of Osteopathic Medicine’, which means they have full medical training alongside their osteopathic qualification. This entitles them to call themselves ‘Doctor’ and to practice in all areas of medicine, as any other doctor would. 

You sometimes hear chiropractors referred to as ‘Doctor’. This is because they use the courtesy title ‘Doctor of Chiropractic’ (D.C.). If you’re unsure whether your practitioner has a medical qualification, it’s best to check.

What should I wear when seeing an Osteopath?

Because osteopaths look at the way the whole body functions, it’s likely they’ll want to examine different areas, not just the area where you have pain. 

It’s best, therefore, to wear something that allows for this, such as sports shorts and a sports bra. 

Your osteopath will only ask you to dress down as far as necessary for examination and treatment. If you wish, you can bring a friend or family member to accompany you into the treatment – just let us know when you book. 

Do Osteopaths treat sports injuries?

Most minor sports injuries are amenable to osteopathic treatment. 

These include strains and sprains, tendon problems such as Achilles tendinopathy or tennis elbow, knee pain such as runner’s knee, and overuse injuries such as shin splints. 

Many osteopaths combine manual therapy with other treatments, such as acupuncture or kinesiology taping, to give the best outcomes. They can also offer rehabilitation exercises and advice to ensure you stay active and pain-free. 

At GHC, we have several osteopaths who have specialist knowledge in dealing with sports injuries:

  • Ed uses medical acupuncture and kinesiology taping and treats all kinds of sports people, from dancers to CrossFit athletes to weightlifters.
  • Seb holds a Master’s Degree in Osteopathic Sports Care, and works with many athletes, including professional golfers.
  • Ioannis, himself a keen sportsman, has completed a Master’s Degree in Sports and Exercise Medicine. 
  • Doug incorporates medical acupuncture in his treatments, especially when working with professional dancers.
  • Simon Baron holds a qualification in sports massage alongside his osteopathy degree, and his experience of working with football and rugby players, coaches and athletes at a national level has given him specialist knowledge in performance, rehabilitation and injury prevention.
  • Ami is not only an experienced osteopath but is also registered with the British Acupuncture Council. He treats complex chronic sports injuries, often helping problems where other treatment has failed. 
Is osteopathy safe?

Osteopathy is safe. Osteopaths train for at least three years, and they update their knowledge every year. They complete at least 1000 hours of clinical practice before qualifying. 

Here at GHC, our osteopaths have completed four years of training, and many also hold postgraduate qualifications. 

Some people worry about whether treatment could make them feel worse or cause damage. But 96% of patients report that they are ‘satisfied’ or ‘very satisfied’ with their treatment. And, likewise, 96% report improvement or resolution of their symptoms within six weeks of treatment. 

Sometimes, patients feel tired or sore, or have a headache or nausea following treatment. But these symptoms, though uncommon, are perfectly normal and usually resolve within 24–48 hours. 

Osteopaths put patient safety first and foremost, and they continually carry out risk assessments when deciding how best to treat their patients. They also explain any risks, however small, before treatment starts, and seek the patient’s consent. 

Because osteopaths have a wide array of techniques they can apply, they can often choose an alternative method if the patient prefers. As a patient, then, you’re always in control.